RMIAN Cases in Need of Pro Bono Attorneys

Detained Cases

The following individuals are detained and in need of pro bono attorneys to represent them in their bond cases:

1) A.C. is a 50-year-old undocumented Mexican man. He has lived in the United States since 1997, and has a sixteen-year-old U.S. citizen son. He has a U.S. citizen brother who filed an immigration petition for him in 2001 that may provide him with immigration status in the future. In 2017, A. was residing in Utah when he was cited twice for Driving Under the Influence. As a consequence, ICE apprehended him, detained him and placed him in removal proceedings. A. is in need of an attorney to represent him on bond, so that he may be released and reunited with his family while he fights to stay in the United States.

2) P.N. is a 43-year-old undocumented Mexican man who has lived in the United States for nineteen years. P. was living in Utah prior to his detention. He has two young U.S. citizen children, one of whom has autism and attends a school for children with special needs. His children live with their mother, who is a U.S. citizen, but she abuses drugs, and authorities removed her children (through another relationship) from her home. P. reported the neglect and would like custody of his children. ICE apprehended P. when he was in criminal custody for an outstanding warrant on a 2010 domestic violence allegation by the mother of his children. He is in need of representation on bond so that he may be released from detention and can fight to remain in the United States from his home.

3) P.C. is a 33-year-old undocumented Mexican man who has limited education and struggles to understand the immigration process. He has lived in the United States for three years. ICE apprehended him at his workplace, an Asian restaurant in Colorado, where he was being abused. ICE arrived looking for someone else, but instead arrested P. and the other undocumented workers. P.’s employers hit him and forced him to work thirteen hours a day and seven days a week. He has a pending claim against his employers, and may qualify for a U or T visa as a consequence. He is in need of an attorney to represent him on bond.


Non-Detained Cases

The following children and families are not detained and in need of pro bono attorneys to represent them in their cases:

1) Asylum KPM is a 29-year-old native of Honduras. She and her 8-year-old daughter fled Honduras to flee KPM’s abusive partner, the father of MYP. KPM’s father physically abused her and forced her to have sex with him. In 2013, KPM tried to escape from her partner, but he forced her to come back to him. KPM tried to call the police, but they refused to do anything to help her.  KPM’s partner then started to threaten to take MYP away from her. In 2016, KPM was beaten so badly that she had to go to the hospital. She tried again to contact the police, but they would not do anything to help.  Fearing for her life, KPM took MYP and fled Honduras.

On their way to the United States they came into contact with a woman who told them she could help them cross into the United States. KPM and MYP were taken to a warehouse. KPM was forced to have sex with 3-4 men a night and the kidnappers indicated that they planned to sell MYP.  When they were being transferred to another warehouse, KPM and MYP were able to escape. They crossed the border and were found by immigration officials.

KPM is eligible for asylum based on past persecution by her partner and her fear of future persecution. MYP is eligible for asylum as a derivative on KPM’s asylum application. RMIAN is currently screening KPM and MYP further to determine if they are also T visa eligible. Their next hearing before the immigration court is scheduled for October 4, 2017 at 1:30pm. Their application for asylum must be filed with the court by December 23, 2017.

2) U-Visa MSM was the victim of sexual abuse at the hands of her uncle. MSM reported the crime to the police and was helpful in the investigation and prosecution of the crime. She therefore is eligible for a U-Visa. The Denver Police Department signed a Law Enforcement Certification on July 14, 2017, confirming MSM’s victimization and cooperation. That certification is valid for six months from the date of signature. Thus, MSM’s Petition for U Nonimmigrant Status must be receipted by the Vermont Service Center prior to January 14, 2018. SMS entered the United States without inspection, so she will need to file an I-192 application to waive this and any other grounds of inadmissibility.

3) U-Visa MCP was the victim of domestic violence at the hands of her partner. MCP reported the crime to the police and was helpful in the investigation and prosecution of the crime. She is therefore eligible for a U-Visa. The Denver District Attorney’s Office signed a Law Enforcement Certification on July 27, 2017, confirming MCP’s victimization and cooperation. That certification is valid for six months from the date of signature. Thus, MCP’s Petition for U Nonimmigrant Status must be receipted by the Vermont Service Center prior to January 27, 2018. MCP has two minor children who are eligible for derivative U-nonimmigrant status.

4) SIJS KMB is a 16-year-old boy from Honduras. He was abandoned by his father and neglected by his mother who forced him to quit school and work from a very young age. KMB fled Honduras when gangs started threatening to kill him if he didn’t join them. He is SIJS eligible based on the abandonment and neglect he suffered by his parents and because it is not in his best interests to be returned to Honduras. He is currently living with his aunt in Denver County who needs representation to file a petition for allocation of parental responsibilities over KMB. KMB needs representation to file for SIJS and potentially asylum with USCIS, as well as representation before the Denver Immigration Court in his removal proceedings.